[Polyurethane vessels for microvascular surgical training to reduce animal use] [Article in German]

Main Article Content

Sonja A. Meier
Axel Lang
Gertrude M. Beer

Abstract

Aim: Systematic training of the manual skills is inevitable in learning microsurgery. Generally, first exercises are done on two-dimensional models, then the training continues on animals. With the growing ethical awareness, the obligation to protect animals and the stricter animal protection laws, realistic three-dimensional models have become necessary for training of microsurgery. However, the available alternatives all have certain disadvantages. We tested vessels made of polyurethane for microvascular surgical training and compared them to the available three-dimensional synthetic alternatives.
Description of the training model: Rose-coloured (arteries) or blue (veins), opaque vessels with a minimal wall thickness of 0.12 mm and a minimal internal diameter of 1 mm are used. To mimic the surgical access and the depth of the operative field, the vessels can be embedded in a synthetic box with or without a cap. The completed anastomosis is checked by injection of a coloured fluid.
Experiences: The consistency and the variable relation of the thickness of the wall to the internal diameter very closely reflect the biological situation. Even training on very fragile venous walls is possible in all manners. After completion of anastomosis the vessels can be opened longitudinally to check the patency of the anastomotic site.
Discussion: The described polyurethane vessels are very suitable for microsurgical training as a useful step between the two-dimensional model and the animal. The number of animals required for microsurgical training can clearly be reduced by the use of such synthetic polyurethane vessels.

Article Details

How to Cite
Meier, S. A., Lang, A. and Beer, G. M. (2004) “[Polyurethane vessels for microvascular surgical training to reduce animal use] [Article in German]”, ALTEX - Alternatives to animal experimentation, 21(3), pp. 135-138. Available at: https://www.altex.org/index.php/altex/article/view/953 (Accessed: 24January2021).
Section
Short communications